Thursday, 21 October 2010

So...

Sorry, too much theory-reading this evening to write a blog post - though there is still a pile of books looking anxiously at me, awaiting reviews - so instead I'll throw a question over to you. Nice and easy one. What are you reading at the moment? And I'll throw in a great painting by Vanessa Bell that I saw on Claire's blog, The Captive Reader.

31 comments:

  1. Loving The British Museum is Falling Down, after a nearly 25-year hiatus. David Lodge: hilarious.

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  2. The Season of Second Chances, by Diane Meier. It's pretty good. And I just started Strong Poison by Dorothy L Sayers.

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  3. Gorgeous painting, Simon.
    I'm currently reading several books, somehow trying to do justice to them all.
    THE BLIND ASSASSIN by Margaret Atwood
    SEVEN SUSPECTS by Michael Innes
    BRYANT AND MAY OFF THE RAILS by Christopher Fowler

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  4. The Provincial Lady in London. Love it.

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  5. Just finished Star of the Sea by Joseph O'Connor and The Report by Kean. In the middle of a reread of At Mrs. Lippencote's by Elizabeth Taylor. The best, however, is that I'm having dinner with Book Snob tomorrow evening.

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  6. Confucius' Analects (for school), The House of the Seven Gables (with my SIL), El Dorado by Baroness Orczy (aloud to my kids), The Holiness of God by R.C. Sproul, and just for me, The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins. (I know, I know, but I just can't stick to one book at a time. ;) )

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  7. Ms. Hempel Chronicles by Sarah Shun-lien Bynum

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  8. In answer to your question: Mr. Rosenblum Dreams in English by Natasha Solomons. And on my Kindle: Scarlet Feather by Maeve Binchy (a second reading). I don't think I've seen MB's name here. Do you read her, Simon? She really is quite a chronicler of old and new Ireland. I prefer her later books.

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  9. I'm reading Sophie Hannah right now. I love the picture though I saw it earlier as well.

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  10. Nice picture -- I might pinch it for my series.
    I'm reading three books: Last Orders by Graham Swift (for work), The Shuttle by F H Burnett (on e-reader), and Maggie O'Farrell's The Distance Between Us.

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  11. Just finished "The Fountainhead" by Ayn Rand, which I found enjoyable but not as good as "Atlas Shrugged", which I reviewed in August. Interesting to see Yvette's post. I am in deep mourning having now finished Christopher Fowler's Bryant and May series, and can only recommend them again and again to anyone who may have this pleasure still to come.

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  12. Rob Young's superb Electric Eden which is an excellent, thoughtful and thought-provoking look at the history (from Elgar, Sharp etc. to the present day) of folk music in Britain. Very strongly recommended indeed; do have a look at his weblog.

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  13. I'm reading "Electric Eden" too following the rave recommendation of a friend. For old hippies like me it's a wonderful trip down memory lane & I'm digging out music I haven't listened to for years. Great stuff.

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  14. Marking Time by Elizabeth Jane Howard, book #2 in the Cazalet Chronicles. I found this book through this blog somehow (the link, then the next link..). It's sweet, wonderful clear young adult characters, wonderful place sense (WWI in England). I love it and I've got my sister hooked on it, too.

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  15. I just spend most of the night finishing Tess Gerritsen's Ice Cold. Absolutely gripping.

    (Season of Second Chances IS a wonderful book.)

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  16. Aunty Mame by Patrick Dennis. Snorting with laughter.

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  17. Breathing Lessons by Anne Tyler and whatever you give me for a present later...!
    lge

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  18. Just finished The Meaning of Night by Michael Cox, which I loved, and am pausing with a Georgette Heyer mystery before jumping in to the sequel, The Glass of Time.

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  19. I had never seen that painting before, thanks. As a writer, am I imagining the gilded lining of the pages of that open book? Echoing that glowing yellow stripe around the chair.

    Nothing is better than reading.

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  20. Back again to quickly say I quit Mr. Rosenblum Dreams in English. I found it difficult and sad to read.

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  21. Need to start a new book - now :-) Just finish The Flight from the Enchanter by Iris Murdoch. What do you recommend?

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  22. I'm reading The Beekeeper's Apprentice by Laurie R. King. Published in 1994, this is the first in a series featuring an older Sherlock Holmes and teenager Mary Russell. It's good entertainment.

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  23. Barchester Towers which I'm loving. Turning into a proper Trollope fan - though I'm not ready to call him Anthony yet.

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  24. I'm reading 'Housekeeping' by Marilynne Robinson, which I am loving so far!

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  25. A Summer in the Country by Marcia Willett.

    Katherine's Marriage by D E Stevenson.

    Ysabel by Guy Gavriel Kay.

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  26. The Meaning of Night by Michael Cox and If On A Winter's Night a Traveller by Italo Calvino. I'm also a HUGE fan of Bryant & May and hopefully there'll be more. Rumour has it we might see them on tv!

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  27. David, I'm a big fan of the Russell/Holmes series by Laurie R. King. I, too, recommend these books. I re-read THE BEEKEEPER'S APPRENTICE, O JERUSALEM and THE MOOR all the time. Fabulous!

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  28. At an antique fair in Texas, I recently purchased a vintage framed print by Suzanne Valadon (1927). I knew she was somehow connected with the Impressionists, for whom I have a great admiration. I am very fond of the print, which in turn tweaked an interest in knowing more about her, so I am currently reading "Utrillo's Mother" by Sarah Baylis (pub. 1987), and is described as "an inspired novel based on the imagined life of French painter Suzanne Valadon." She was the mother of the noted French painted Maurice Utrillo. The book presents a unique view of what it was like to be an extremely poor but aspiring artist during the early 1900's in France. Enjoy your blog very much!

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  29. I'm reading Howard's End and finding it a lot stranger and better than when I expected.

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  30. What a beautiful painting ! Would love to have a print of that.
    Currently reading - "Beowulf on the Beach" by Jack Murnighan. Its much better than it sounds :)

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  31. Howard Jacobson's The Flinker Question. I always try to get hold of each year's Booker Prize Winner.

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